Where do I put the paper?
A handy guide to the world's toilets
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I recently spent a few months travelling around South America and soon stumbled into a minefield. A metaphorical minefield of social embarassment and practical problems that the guide books did little to alleviate. The problem? What to do with the toilet paper after it had been "used".

I have to admit that I'd imagined that in most countries in the world, putting toilet paper down the toilet was the accepted method of disposal, but if you're a Western European or similar type of person and you decide to do a bit of travelling, where you put the paper can suddenly turn into a bit of a problem – at least until you get the hang of the country and their rules.

Now, fair enough, there are plenty of guide books and you'll probably have one (if not, feel free to click a link and buy something, it all helps pay for hosting), and some books for some countries were quite specific, but many aren't, some don't mention it at all and there were some glaring omissions when you could really do with knowing; this is the product of a spare few weeks when I got back.

So, if you're a travelling sort and don't have access to, or are a bit shy to ask, a local, the bits of information collected here will hopefully help you out in those occasional sticky situations.

So, where do I put the paper?

If you flick through the lists at the top you'll find a list of countries and what to do with the paper after you've finished with it; I won't claim that it's entirely accurate or complete, it's a partially exhaustive list of where to put the paper after you've visited the little boys' or girls' room. I have tried to be accurate, but there's bound to be some mistakes, so let me know if you know better (email and contacty bits liberally dotted about).

And of course, if there are instructions given to you locally, follow them. I don't want to be held responsible for an international incident if you bung up the bog somewhere posh.

As I was fiddling about with this site again, it occurred to me how many countries don't have access to decent water, let alone toilets. So, if you want to help, go to the Toilet Twinning website, donate, and make a difference. I've just bought a latrine in Liberia.

Afghanistan
If you can find a toilet in Afghanistan, well done! You'll also be extremely lucky to find anything approaching toilet paper, if you do, you'll end up throwing it in the same hole you've just used or burying it in the ground. You're unlikely to be a tourist in Afghanistan, and if you are, you're not going to be the sort that's worried about crapping in a hole.

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Albania
Albanian toilets tend to have a bottle or container of water to wash with rather than paper; however, European-style toilets are often available in posher hotels. You can often flush paper down the toilets, although it's best to double-check and if specifically told otherwise, use the facilities provided.

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Algeria Public facilities are rare in Algeria and you should always have a back-up roll with you. Toilets are often squatting types, but European-style toilets are common in more 'upmarket' hotels and restaurants. There should be a little bin by the side put your toilet paper in that. Or use the local method if there's a bottle or jug of water.

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Andorra
You're fine to put the paper down the toilet in Andorra. Bear in mind that you will come across the old-style squat toilets – which are little more than holes in the ground – in many places.

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Angola
Where you do find a 'normal' toilet in Angola, it's unlikely it'll be connected to a decent water supply, so you'll be flushing it with the bucket of water provided. Toilet paper goes in the other bucket.

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Antigua
The sewage system can't cope with paper and other products in Antigua – unless you're very lucky! – and running water is something of a luxury away from the major tourist centres; use the bin provided for paper.

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Argentina
Tricky one Argentina, it's a big old place and rules for the top don't always apply in Patagonia. So, most of the time, put the paper in the bin provided, *except* in Buenos Aires where you often can just stick it down the loo. Posh European-style hotels can take paper as well. The general rule seems to be: "if there's a bin in the loo, use that".

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Armenia
At the time of writing this it seems that there's a major shortage in toilet paper in Armenia, so take plenty with you if you're going. A lot of the time in public toilets you're going to be squatting and throwing the paper in the bin after use, but some of the more modern hotels (not the post-Soviet lumps you'll come across most often) can take it in the sewage system; best to check, but use a bin if there is one.

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Australia
Unless you're properly in the outback, where you'll be burying the paper or burning it, you can happily flush your paper. Australia has a very high standard of living, and public toilets in towns and cities are abundant, hygienic and usually free.

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Austria
You can flush the paper in Austria. Bear in mind the Austrians are rather poo-fixated, so there's often a little shelf in the bowl so you can, well, check everything.

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Azerbaijan
Public toilets are rare in Azerbaijan and even if you find one, there's unlikely to be any paper as the locals tend to wash, rather than wipe. Most of the time you'll be putting the paper in a bin, rather than flushing.

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Bahamas
Make sure you've got a stash of paper if you're in the Bahamas, there's really not that much available locally. You can usually flush the paper unless specifically told otherwise.

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Bahrain
More often than not, you're going to need your own supply of paper in Bahrain as the locals prefer to wash. In high-star hotels you'll be able to flush, but be prepared to use a bin if provided.

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Bangladesh
Locals use the water provided to wash, so either get used to that method or carry your own supply. Bear in mind that the sewage system is most likely to be a pipe or open 'water' course, so anything you do throw in is likely to block the everything up, with unpleasant consequences for all. Bin or burn your paper.

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Barbados
As a general rule you'll be able to flush in Barbados; however, toilets often don't have the water pressure to flush it, and you don't want to bung the place up, so check for any signs of obvious binning.

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Belarus
In Belarus you'll probably have to use the bin provided, their system mostly can't cope with flushing.

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Belgium
You should always be able to flush the paper in Belgium. There isn't much in the way of public toilets in Belgium and very few are free; make sure you've got 50 cents or so just in case. Big hotels and restaurants should let you use theirs if you ask politely – always best to be polite in Belgium, that's my motto for life.

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Belize
Always make sure you've got a roll of paper with you, it's in short supply in Belize. Unless specifically told you can, don't flush the paper, use the bin provided.

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Benin
Benin is very poor, so they don't often provide toilet paper, carry your own and don't even try to flush it, the plumbing system really can't cope with it.

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Bhutan
Most toilets are of the squat variety in Bhutan, throw the paper in the bin or, if you're in the countryside, bury it or burn it.

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Bolivia
Always put the paper in the bin provided. If you're out in the middle of nowhere, bury the paper and any "remains". As an aside, do you know why you shouldn't drink the tap water in Bolivia? Well, when the water and sewage pipes were laid, they were put very close together and now, as they've started to corrode, where one starts and one stops isn't necessarily as clearly defined as you'd like...

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Bosnia Herzegovina
Public toilets are very rare in Bosnia, toilet paper even more so take some with you. Mostly you can't flush the paper. If you need to go, ask in a bar or cafe where they often have a hole-in-the-ground squatter; bus stations are also handy for facilities.

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Botswana
In most places in Botswana, use the bin provided or bury or burn your paper, don't flush it, you'll flood the place.

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Brazil
In common with most Latin American countries, the sewage system in Brazil can't cope with paper being flushed, so use the bin provided. If you're in the jungle or up the Amazon, take your paper with you and dispose of it somewhere hygienic, or burn it on the way. Brazilian public toilets are mostly very good, although if you're in Rio, avoid the portaloos in Lapa at all costs.

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Brunei
Squat-style toilets are common in Brunei and you'll commonly find a hose or other water carrier to wash with. Throwing paper in one of these toilets will probably bung the whole place up, so throw it away. European-style toilets, where found, suggest a sewage system that can accept paper – but always double-check.

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Bulgaria
In Bulgaria it's best to use the bins provided, as you often can't flush paper or you'll block the pipes. Hotels and well-known fast food restaurants usually have clean toilets with paper available, other than that, you're on your own, so make sure you've got a roll with you.

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Burkina Faso
In Burkina Faso you'll be cleaning up with your hand (make sure it's your left hand) and water from a colourful teapot provided if you're living like the locals. If you're using paper, use a bin of provided, if not, dispose of it sensibly. You can't flush the paper.

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Burundi
The locals of Burundi don't use paper, so you'll be lucky to find any. Don't flush the paper, throw it away.

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Cambodia
Most of your pooint time in Cambodia will be squatting, but airports and more upmarket European-style hotels will have 'normal' toilets. Squat toilets in the country and bigger hotels will have a septic tank that can take paper, but middle-range and lower end places will have a bin for the paper as the system can't take it. If in doubt, use the bin provided.

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Cameroon
In general, the water pressure and sewage system in Cameroon can't take paper, so use the bin. Public toilets are few and far between, but the government are installing 1.5 million more according to the internet.

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Canada
In Canada the paper goes in the toilet. Unless you're a bear, everyone knows where bears go. Not that they use paper of course, they use rabbits, soft and absorbent fur you see.

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Cape Verde
Most of the time you'll be squatting in Cape Verde, throw the paper down the hole. Higher standard European-style places will have plumbed in toilets, but they still might not take paper, so use a bin if there's one provided.

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Central African Republic
We have to assume you're using a hole in the ground or squatting in the Central African Republic, throw the paper in there. You won't be flushing anything.

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Chad
Firstly, congratulations on getting to Chad, not many people would choose this place as a holiday destination. Public toilets are going to be pretty nasty. Nowhere in central Africa has a toilet system capabale of taking paper and other items, always use the bin provided.

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Chile
Although much of Chile is very well designed and flushable, check for the bins first and remember that many public toilets don't provide paper, so carry your own. You need to throw the paper in the bin, don't flush it as the system can't take it.

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China
There a wide variety of toilets in China, from European-style porcelain numbers to holes in the ground. Generally speaking, use the bin provided for the paper, but if one isn't provided for holes-in-the-ground, just drop it in.

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Colombia
In common with most Latin American countries, you'll be using the bin for paper. Oddly, although public toilets are fairly common, toilet seats are rare as hen's teeth – and not just in public toilets, in posher places such as restaurants and cafes. You'll often find better public toilets are ones you have to pay a few pesos to use.

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Comoros
In Comoros you may be better off using the water provided to wash, rather than toilet paper. If you must use it, use a bin or dispose of the paper safely, not down the toilet.

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Congo
Don't drop the paper into whatever you've used as a toilet in the Congo; burn, bury or bin anything you use.

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Congo (Democratic Rep)
From all research, it seems that the locals of the Congo (DRC) have a rather cavalier attitude to paper disposal, so best bin any you use rather than contributing to the problem.

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Costa Rica
In Costa Rica, much like many Central and South American countries, there is a little bin by the side of the toilet, put the paper in there. More upmarket hotels will have toilets that can flush paper, but the vast majority just don't have the pipes and pressure to prevent a good solid blockage.

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Croatia
I have been reliably informed that you can flush the toilet paper in Croatia, although it does seem that production by state-run industry is in danger of failing.

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Cuba
According to the The Rough Guide to Cuba: "No plumbing system...can cope with waste paper, so in order to avoid blockages, remember to dispose of your paper in the bins provided". That said, in European-style five star hotels, it's fine to use the toilet unless specifically told otherwise.

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Cyprus
Never flush the paper down the toilet in Cyprus; always put it in the little bin provided. It's often worth carrying a little plastic bag as well, as bins aren't always provided.

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Czech Republic
In general you can flush toilet paper in the Czech Republic; however, as usual, if you're in the woods, burn or bury it.

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Denmark
The Danes are very clever people. They have a sewage system that can take the paper, so don't just throw it about.

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Djibouti
More often than not you'll find a bin by the toilet in Djibouti, dispose of your paper in there.

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Dominica
Dominica is another country where you'll always need a roll about your person; you'll be putting paper in the bin unless you want a lot of unpleasant water sloshing abbout your feet.

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Dominican Republic
Much the same as most Carribean islands, don't flush the paper, use the basket provided in the Dominican Republic.

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East Timor
You're not really likely to be on holiday in East Timor, if you are, don't flush the paper as it'll end up in an open sewer or blocking the toilet. Use the bin, bury or burn it.

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Ecuador
Use the bin provided in Ecuador, don't flush the paper. Most of South and Central America use the same system.

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Egypt
In the majority of Egypt you'll have to throw the paper in the bin; although, high-star European-style hotels tend to have sewage systems that can take it. Best to check, if not, use the little bin if one is provided. If you're not in a posh hotel, you'll most often have to use the bin.

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El Salvador
If you've had a flick through the rest of this place you'll be used to the Central American method, so use the bin provided for your paper in El Salvador, don't flush it or it'll end in tears. And probably poo all over the floor.

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Equatorial Guinea
Any toilet you're likely to find in Equatorial Guinea won't be able to take paper, so use a bin.

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Eritrea
Toilet paper is as rare as hen's teeth in Eritrea, if you want it, bring your own. Again, the locals tend to wash rather than wipe, so put any you use in a bin or dispose of it properly.

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Estonia
You'll probably be safe to flush in Estonia, but if you happen across a bin that's obviously uses for paper, follow the locals and use that.

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Ethiopia
Bin it, burn it or bury it in Ethiopia. The locals wash, not wipe and any system can't cope with paper.

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Fiji
Chances are you'll be binning your paper in hotels and restaurants in Fiji – although it's not definite there'll be a toilet in any of them. Out of the cities you'll be popping behind a bush, so bury or burn.

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Finland
Unless you're in the middle of nowhere in a forest, where you'll be burying or burning the paper, you can flush it in Finland. Public toilets are rare, but restaurants and shopping centres are a good place to look. Oh, and apparently public toilets on the roadsides may need you to text "open" to a number printed inside; best make sure your phone works there!

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France
Contrary to popular belief, many places in France have toilets that you can actually safely use and you'll be able to flush the paper. This isn't the 1980s you know. Having said that, the French still like to squat over a hole in the ground or crap behind a bush (or car or tree or anything to hand), in these cases, act politely and bin your paper somewhere hygeinic. Of course, you still can't drink the water and they eat snails you know.

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Gabon
It's bins in Gabon I'm afraid. Put the paper in either the bin provided, or put it in a plastic bag and take it with you to dispose of properly.

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Gambia
The locals prefer holes in the ground-style toilets and washing rather than paper in The Gambia. In these toilets you'll be using a bucket of water to flush, so take paper with you or put it in a bin if provided. Some more basic pits are just covered when full and a new hole dug in place, again it's best to take the paper with you as it doesn't break down properly. There are flush lavatories with septic tanks that are periodically emptied, but it's best to check whether these systems will take paper.

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Georgia
It's mostly squat toilets in Georgia; however, European-style toilets are on the increase in more upmarket establishments. You'll probably need to put the paper in the bin or take it with you.

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Germany
There dashed clever these Germans. In all but the very oddest of cases you can flush the paper down the toilet. Germans are poo-obsessed, so bear in mind that their toilets have little shelves or slopes at the back so, before you flush (presumably several times to shift everything in some cases) you can have a good old look at your producings. Lovely.

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Ghana
Bins are the norm in Ghana, although you'll probably not be supplied with any paper, so stock up in advance.

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Greece
In Greece, it's paper in the bin time again I'm afraid. The Greek plumbing system can't take paper and it'll be bunged up and flooding if you try to flush the paper. Newer, up-market hotels should be able to accept the papery deposit, but in most cases it's best not to risk it.

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Grenada
Did you know it's illegal to swear in public in Grenada? It is, so be careful how you phrase the "where do I put the paper?" question; in answer, bin it.

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Guatemala
In common with a lot of Central and South America, the bin by the side of the toilet is for putting paper in. The sewage system and toilet plumbing in Guatemala can't cope with paper.

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Guinea
In common with much of west Africa you'll be cleaning up with your hand in Guinea (make sure it's your left hand) and water from a colourful teapot provided if you're living like the locals. If you're using paper, use a bin of provided, if not, dispose of it sensibly. You can't flush the paper.

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Guinea-Bissau
Carry your own paper around Guinea-Bissau and take a rubbish bag to take the used paper away with you.

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Guyana
It's fair to say that if you've done any travelling in South America you quickly learn that you'd better have a roll of toilet paper with you, and you'd better not try and flush it if you don't want the loo to block and flood the floor. Throw paper in the bin, or take it with you and dispose of it properly.

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Haiti
There's no such thing as a public toilet in Haiti and anywhere you do go the sewage system will be basic and overstretched at best, so don't try and flush anything; throw your paper in the bin provided or take it with you. The locals are more than happy to relieve themselves behind bushes or just at the side of the road, so don't worry if you get horribly caught short.

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Honduras
Western-style toilets are pretty common in Honduras, but you really don't want to try and flush anything; put your paper in the bin provided.

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Hungary
You should be alright to flush the paper in most places in Hungary. Water pressure may be an issue in older buildings, but in the most part the sewage system can take anything you can throw at (in?) it.

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Iceland
You will be excellently serviced for public toilets in Iceland and, like the rest of the Scandinavian countries, flushing the paper is no problem.

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India
Indian toilets employ a 'wash and go' cleaning facility in the vast majority of cases. If you are going to use paper, put it in the bin provided. Oddly, the internet tells me that there are more mobile phones in india than toilets; I wonder what the ratio is in the UK.

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Indonesia
Wash where possible, don't flush in Indonesia. There is an excellent How To... guide on using traditional Indonesian toilets here and presumably this translates nicely for other squatting toilets worldwide.

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Iran
The internet suggests that if you can get hold of local paper in Iran, it will be huge; twice the size of Western-style paper. Whatever you do though, don't try and flush it, the water pressure is too low and the pipes are too thin to take anything but poo. Iran is another country where the wash-and-go option is preferred by the locals.

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Iraq
Yep, you guess it, Iraqis are the fans of the old 'squat and wash' method of using the toilet. If you do have paper, put it in the bin, the holes in the ground and pipes really can't take anything else.

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Ireland (Republic)
It's good to know that the the Irish are more than capable of flushing the paper. Just as well really, all that Guinness and you'll be needing a proper facility.

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Israel
So, I'm upating this for the frst time in ages as apparently where I'd previously advised that 'the biggest problem you're going to face with Israel toilets is the over-exuberant water pressure and flushing action' and said to 'stand well back when flushing as you may well be startled (and presumably unexpectedly washed) by automatic flushers in some public toilets', it turns out that the sewer systems can't deal with paper, so there'll be a bin to put it in; keep your eyes open, it might not be something you're told about in public buildings and older residential buildings.

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Italy
Usually Italian toilets are very powerful and can shift a lot. Feel free to flush unless specifically told not to. Having said that, public toilets are few and far between in most major cities and tend to be pretty unpleasant. Supposely you can use restaurant and cafe facilities for free, but you might be wise to buy something cheap if you're likely to be going back.

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Ivory Coast
There is a severe lack of sanitary toilet facilities of any type in The Ivory Coast and public health is a major problem. Composting toilets are slowly being introduced wherever possible, but it's holes in the ground that leak straight into the water table in a lot of places. Take your paper with you and dispose of it somewhere safe or burn it.

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Jamaica
Public toilets in Jamaica are few and far between and often unpleasant. Waterless composting toilets are being introduced slowly to help with environmental problems. Wherever you happen to go, you'll be throwing the paper in the bin, don't flush it.

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Japan
Japanese toilets are incredible space-aged and, if television has taught us anything, are practically intelligent, so you can flush the paper and you'll probably have your weight measured before and after and a pleasant chat or piece of music as you're using the facilities.

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Jordan
The Lonely Planet seems to suggest that public toilets in Jordan should be avoided at all costs, but provides no extra detail. Maybe they're infested with scorpions? You'll find both squat and Western-style toilets, but neither can take flushing your paper, so always use the bin provided.

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Kazakhstan
Both the flush systems and holes in the ground usually seen in Kazakhstan are unable to deal with toilet paper, so throw it in the bin. It's also worth bearing in mind that ex-Soviet countries favour large-grain sandpaper style paper, so make sure you've got some lovely soft three-ply with you. Oh, and public toilets are often dark, so a torch will come in handy.

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Kenya
Sanitiation in Kenya is a massive problem, and out of the cities you'll be lucky to find anything better than a public pit latrine. Eco-friendly composting toilets are being introduced, but wherever you go, take your paper with you and bin or burn it.

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Kiribati
Until fairly recently, just going where you could seems to have been the norm on Kiribati; fortunately this is changing and sanitary systems are being introduced. Bin or burn your paper.

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Korea (North)
If you happen to find yourself in North Korea and can find a toilet that doesn't have a microphone listening in to your every word (imagine having the job of listening in to that), you'll probably be throwing the paper down the hole you use, but you can flush it in most decadent Western-style toilets. Who says Communism is a bad thing?

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Korea (South)
In general, South Koreans don't flush their paper, they put it in the bin that is provided by the toilet.

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Kosovo
Toilet facilities are very limited in Kosovo; carry a good supply of toilet paper and bin or burn it when you're done.

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Kuwait
If you can find a public toilet in Kuwait, well done. Kuwaitis are mostly washers not wipers so the sewage system can't deal with paper. Put it in the bin.

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Kyrgyzstan
It's ex-Soviet sandpaper again in Kyrgyzstan; in towns, holes in the ground and the incredibly rare Western-style toilets can't deal with the paper so bin it. If you're caught short in the countryside, dig a hole and burn the paper.

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Laos
Public toilets in Laos are horrific and mostly squatters. Take your own paper with you and throw it in the bin provided afterwards.

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Latvia
The bathrooms of the Baltic states have been transformed since the fall of the Soviet Union. None of your crap-in-a-hole problems any more in Latvia and, joy of joys, in the vast majority of places you can flush to your heart's content. That said, outside of the main cities and in the older parts of Riga, you may be binning but it should be fairly obvious.

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Lebanon
In many toilets of the Lebanon the sewage and flush system is too old to take paper, so don't flush, bin it.

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Lesotho
According to the United Nations, the majority of people in Lesotho have no access to proper toilet facilities and sanitary conditions are terrible. You won't be flushing your paper even if you find something that could pass as a "normal" toilet (squat or otherwise). Bin your paper as long drop holes in the ground are the norm.

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Liberia
Sanitation in Liberia is horrific and disease is rife. Open sewers are the norm, so paper put into the system will quickly lead to health and vermin problems. Bin it as cleanly as possible, or burn it if you have to use paper.

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Libya
Public toilets don't exist in Libya, try and use a hotel if you're caught short. You'll be binning the paper, and you'd better be carrying some about because it's not in massive abundance wherever you are.

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Liechtenstein
Ruthlessly efficiant these Liechtenstineans (?); flush the paper with alacrity. By many standards, Liechtenstein is considered to have the best public toilets in Europe, I bet that's a hotly contested award every year.

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Lithuania
Same as Latvia really, Lithuania has clean, decent toilets that can take flushing the paper. Enjoy!

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Luxembourg
Public toilets in Luxembourg are rare and you'll be expected to leave a small tip (a few cents), but are generally clean and well maintained. Flush the paper.

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Macedonia
Macedonia doesn't have the greatest of facilities, but in upmarket and European-style hotels you'll be able to flush the paper. In other places, there'll be a bin by the side of the toilet so throw the paper in there.

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Madagascar
A lot of Madagascans don't have access to suitable, sanitary toilets, so you'll be lucky to find anything remotely Western-style. Bin your paper.

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Malawi
Sanitation is a big problem in Malawi, with clean water and sewage systems that aren't riddled with cholera being very rare; unprotected pit latrines are very common and very unpleasant. Don't try and flush paper, bin it.

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Malaysia
Public toilets in Malaysia are so bad they'll test the stamina of even the most rugged traveller. If paper is provided, don't flush it as the system just can't cope. In upmarket hotels you'll probably be ok to flush, but as the locals tend to wash not wipe, you'll be better of binning the paper if a basket is provided, just in case.

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Maldives
Most villages now have composting toilets and Western-style toilets are available in the most tourist-minded locations, although a lot of them will be outside and unroofed. Wherever you go in the Maldives you'll probably be washing if you want to blend in; however you chose to go don't flush toilet paper.

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Mali
Pollution – water and crap (literal and metaphorical) just lying about everywhere – is a big problem in Mali. All toilet paper should be burned or buried.

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Malta
Toilets in tax-efficient Malta are generally good and clean, with plenty of public facilities, but be prepared to pay/tip. Flush the paper.

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Marshall Islands
You're not going to find anything approaching a posh toilet on the Marshall Islands, mostly they'll be very simple systems where your flushing with a bucket of water. Burn or bin the paper, don't flush.

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Mauritania
Chances are you'll be crapping in a hole in the ground and burning or burying the paper in Mauritania.

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Mauritius
You'll be binning in Mauritius I'm afraid.

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Mexico
In common with most of south and central America, you're going to be spending a lot of the time you're going to be throwing the paper in bins in Mexico, so keep an eye out for them. Some higher class hotels have European-style flush toilets, but it should be fairly obvious which are which.

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Micronesia
You're unlikely to come across a flush toilet in Micronesia. Bin the paper.

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Moldova
Many Moldovan toilets will have a bin by the side for the paper so use that, generally speaking you can't flush the paper or other products.

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Monaco
Monaco is one of the richest countries in the world. Crap away in luxury and flush happily!

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Mongolia
Again, the local plumbing is falling apart and can't take anything in the way of paper or other products. Use the bins provided in Mongolia.

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Montenegro
Montenegro is a lovely place. You'll still be crapping in a hole and using the bins for toilet paper though, sorry.

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Morocco
In Morocco there should be a little bin by the side, use that. Or use the local method if there's a bottle or jug of water. This is largely dependent on whether the hotel/restaurant etc has enough water pressure and/or a decent septic tank.

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Mozambique
Most areas of Mozambique would consider running water an unaffordable luxury. Those that don't, don't waste much using it to flush toilets so be careful and, if possible, use a squat toilet with a flushing bucket. Throw your paper in the bin, the systems can't cope with it.

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Myanmar (Burma)
Loving your work, not many people go to Myanmar (Burma), and if you happen to find a toilet (and these days they tend to be Western-style sitters rather than squatting over hole sorts), put the paper in the basket or bin provided. It's worth noting here, that if you're caught short on the road, it's best not to go too far off track to find a bush as there are an awful lot of landmines littered about.

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Namibia
If you're out in the wilds, watch out for snakes and scorpions then burn the paper; burying is no good, the land is too dry to allow it to rot down. Hotels and lodgings in Namibia tend to have Western-style flushers, in the villages you'll be looking at long drops. Bin the paper.

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Nauru
Composting toilets are becoming the norm in Nauru, these stop water getting out and back into the drinking supply. In composting toilets you're ok to throw the paper in, elsewhere, bin it.

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Nepal
Squat toilets and water to wash with are the most common option in Nepal. If you've got your own paper and use it, throw it in the bin provided.

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Netherlands
Feel free to put the paper down the toilet, the Dutch are very civilised like that. Having said that, the Dutch are like the Germans in the "let's have a look at what you've done" stakes and you will find an inspection shelf in the bowl. Goodness knows what the point of this is, but be prepared to have to flush a few times if you've been on the sausages the night before. I have recently been told that it's also illegal to wee in public/behind a tree/against a church; the Dutch have a word for it though, "wildplassen" - wild peeing.

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New Zealand
Did you know that all toilet paper in New Zealand is technically still the property of the government? And that it is often considered fashionable to buy paper that is patterned so that it matches the decoration in the bathroom? Almost seems a shame to flush it really, which is the accepted method of disposal in most toilets.

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Nicaragua
As with most of Central America, there will be a small bin to the side of the toilet in Nicaragua. Put the paper in there, the sewage system won't be able to cope with large amounts of paper.

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Niger
It seems that the vast majority of toilets that are available in Niger are composting long-drop type holes in the ground. Some of them may even have a Western-style toilet attached to the top for that luxury feel. In these you can throw the paper (other products should be thrown in the bin) as they will compost down. If you're in the graeat outdoors, bury the paper.

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Nigeria
As a Muslim country, you'll be offered the old washing bucket most commonly in Nigeria. Don't flush your paper, the sewage system is rudimentary at best.

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Norway
You can happily throw the paper in the toilet in Norway, it's very space-aged over there. You'll often find you have to pay to get into one of the many public toilets, make sure you've got exact change. Airport and train station public facilities can still be pretty unpleasant. Oh, and it's illegal to wee behind a tree.

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Oman
Public toilets are severely lacking in Oman and those that are available can be in a pretty poor state; however, there are moves afoot to introduce newer, cleaner pay toilets. Western-style toilets are found in posher hotels but elsewhere you'll be squatting. Always carry a roll of paper and be prepared to bin it somewhere sensible; all toilets provide water to wash with as wiping is considered rather unpleasant by the locals.

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Pakistan
Decent public toilets are few and far between in Pakistan. Upmaket hotels with often have 'proper' toilets. Again, washing is the norm, so if you're carrying and use paper, be prepared to throw it in the bin.

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Palau
Sanitation is pretty rudimentary in Palau and toilets will be basic at best. Probably best to bin the paper if you don't want to bung the whole place up.

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Panama
Back to Central America again; however, in the majority of cases you can flush your paper in Panama. Off the beaten track though you will still have to put your toilet paper in the bins/bags provided; it may seem unsanitary if you've never experienced it before, but it's far better than blocking and flooding all over the place.

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Papua New Guinea
Toilets in Papua New Guinea are mostly squat style and paper won't be provided as the locals use the water or bidet provided. Bins are there to throw the used paper in, so don't drop it in the hole.

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Paraguay
Should you be lucky enough to find a Western-style toilet, remember to put the paper in the bin provided. Paraguay is poor in many places and the sewage system just can't take it.

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Peru
You'll normally find a little bin by the toilet in Peru, use that for the paper. The system can't cope with it and you really don't want to flood the place. That said, I know of at least two places where I was told you could flush the paper, but it's really not worth the risk if you're using a lot.

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Philippines
There are no public toilets in the Philippines, and the locals will often just use a wall. Find a restaurant if you don't fancy that. Bin your paper where ever you go; if you're in the wilds, dig a hole a good distance from anything that looks remotely like drinking water and cover it with a rock.

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Poland
Public toilets are as rare as hen's teeth in Poland, although you should be able to use one in a restaurant or hotel if you're caught short (be prepared to buy something in the former). Hiding behind a tree is not a good idea as it's illegal and you'll end up getting fined. If you do manage to go, you can flush the paper.

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Portugal
Public toilets in Portugal tend to be pretty horrendous so use those in cafes and restaurants where you can; handily, they also tend to be free. Paper can be flushed in most cases, but you may see bins in touristy places (although this is where); if you do, and you're told to, use that.

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Qatar
Reports seem to suggest that toilets, especially public toilets, in Qatar are pretty horrible places – there can't be many places where you'd actually be glad of a semi-hygienic squatter without large puddles around them. Wherever you find to go, put the paper in the bin provided (although in higher quality hotels and restaurants, you may be able to flush it; bin where possible).

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Romania
Although toilets in Ceaucesu-era Romania could be pretty horrific, they are improving these days. You may still be binning the paper in more out of the way places, as older Eastern European and ex-Soviet states tend to use this method, but in most cases in the big cities you can flush; however, if you come across a squatter, don't even think about lobbing the paper in there.

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Russia
You're going to be binning it in most ex-USSR states, and Russia is no different. Despite pipes that look like they're designed to take vodka bottles, they just can't cope, so use the basket or bin provided.

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Rwanda
In most of rural Rwanda you're going to be dealing with a trench or pit, there are no sewage systems to speak of and septic tanks and pit toilets are very rare and flush toilets are rarer than dodos; cities do tend to have western-style toilets though. It's usually a case of binning the paper, but bury or burn if you're in the middle of nowhere.

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St Kitts & Nevis
These days most toilets on St. Kitts and Nevis can take your paper, so you'll be ok to flush. Bear in mind though that some guidebooks will tell you otherwise, but if you can't flush, it'll be fairly obvious.

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St Lucia
The Carribbean sewage system is pretty good these days, so you'll be able to flush in most places in St Lucia.

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Saint Vincent & the Grenadines
It's the Carribbean hat-trick! Bin, don't flush in St Vincent.

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Samoa
Carry your own paper, bin don't flush. Public toilets are extremely rare in Samoa; posher hotels may have composting or septic tanks, but these are even rarer.

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San Marino
Unsurprisingly, San Marino is much like Italy. Usually toilets are very powerful and can shift a lot. Feel free to flush unless specifically told not to. Public toilets are few and far between, try a restaurant if you're caught short but you may have to buy a small item.

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Sao Tome & Principe
Carry your own paper, bin don't flush. Public toilets are extremely rare in Sao Tome; posher hotels may have composting or septic tanks, but these are even rarer.

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Saudi Arabia
As with most Arabic countries you're going to be squatting and washing in Saudi Arabia, they don't really do toilet paper. If you do use paper, throw it away, don't drop it in the hole.

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Senegal
Public toilets don't exist in Senegal, but if you're in a built up area you should be able to use one in a restaurant – be prepared to have to buy something. Petrol stations and bus terminals will have facilities, but these are probably appalling. You'll be binning your paper. Some eco-lodges will have composters, you should be shown how to use them.

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Serbia
You should flush your paper in Serbia.

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Seychelles
Bins again in Seychelles, unless you're washing.

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Sierra Leone
Well, nice to see you're off the beaten path, let's be honest, Sierra Leone isn't a normal holiday destination. Western Africa is often pit toilets with a long drop and hole; it's often best not to throw paper and similar into these holes as they fill up quickly and don't compost properly so throw it away somewhere appropriate. You will find flush toilets, these will quickly block if you put paper in, so again, bin it.

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Singapore
Reports on cleanliness and facilities in Singapore's toilets vary. You will find clean, well-maintained toilets in newer restaurants and shopping malls, but elsewhere, hold your breath. Both squat and 'normal' toilets are common. In public toilets you may well be putting your paper in the bin; newer and classier facilities will allow you to flush. Which you should do, failure to do so is illegal apparently, and you can be hit with a S$75 fine (or so it says here). Oh, there are squatters too that come with hoses to wash, if you're that way inclined.

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Slovakia
You should be able to flush in Slovakia. Toilets are the normal flushing type and public toilets are normally clean. You may have to pay a small amount to use public toilets though; and carry some paper with you, public toilet attendants probably won't give you much in the way of paper.

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Slovenia
Generally speaking Slovenia is a lovely place and, not in entirely unrelated news, you can flush your paper down the toilet.

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Solomon Islands
Toilets are mostly squat style in the Solomon Islands and often composters; paper won't be provided as the locals use the water or bidet provided. Bins are there to throw the used paper in, so don't drop it in the hole.

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Somalia
How did you end up in Somalia? Somalians tend to use toilet paper, although the local varieties tend to be poor quality   assuming you can get hold of it in the first place. You'll be binning the paper, unless you're in the wilds, in which case burning is the accepted method of disposal.

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South Africa
Public toilets are few and far between in South Africa, but do exist. Ask at tourist information or restaurants. Toilets in cities tend to be Western-style and you should be able to flush. In townships and in the countryside, long-drops tend to be most common, bin or throw the paper in.

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Spain
Spain is a bit of a mix. In most cities and beach resorts you can flush the paper. Although you might be asked specifically to use a bin, in which case, do. If you're out in the countryside and stuck in a refugio bury it or burn it. If you're using a camp site, follow the instructions (although if in doubt, flush).

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Sri Lanka
Sri Lankans are washers, so you'll be very lucky to have paper provided. Public toilets, if you can find them, will probably be pretty horrific. However, most toilets are Western-style and restaurants and the like will let you use theirs. Bin your paper, or if you're in the jungle, put it in a plastic bag and take it home with you (for use as a delightful souvenir).

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Sudan
The locals wash with the buckets of water provided, so if you want to use paper, make sure you've got some with you, you'll only be provided with it in the poshest of hotels. You'll encounter both squat and Western-style toilets in Sudan and often be expected to pay a small amount for public facilities; bin the paper, don't throw it in.

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Suriname
You may well end up paying to use a public toilet, assuming you can find one, but don't expect it to be clean. In common with most of South America you'll have to throw the paper in the bin in Suriname as the water pressure is too low, the pipes to narrow and any processing plants far too antiquated to deal with it.

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Swaziland
You'll be using long-drops more often than not in Swaziland. And more often and not you can throw paper into the hole. Use a bin if provided as this will help prevent too much pollution.

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Sweden
Sweden is a lovely country and you are more than welcome to flush your delightfully efficient and comfortable Scandinavian paper down the toilet with abandon. You'll probably have to pay to use public facilities, but they will almost certainly be delightful   except the ones at Skavsta airport, which are workmanlike at best, but free (handy if sodding Ryanair start charging you to go on the plane). Don't wee behind a tree, you'll be fined.

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Switzerland
The Swiss would probably be very angry (but remain assiduously neutral nonetheless) if you suggested you couldn't flush paper down the toilet, you can, and it's recommended that you do. Oh, and if you happen to be in Basle or Lausanne, there are public facilities with one-way mirrored glass, so you can see out while you're in there, but no one can see in. Go on, I dare you.

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Syria
Let's be honest, at the moment if you're in Syria, going to the toilet is going to be one of the less worrying things you'll be facing. That said, you'll be washing, or you'll be binning as a general rule.

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Taiwan
In the majority of cases you'll be binning the paper in Taiwan. However, in some towns, the government has recently set up training programmes to explain to the locals that the sewage system has been updated to cope with the paper, but this is far from the norm. This might sound odd, but as I've been reading up on this stuff, I've come across a similar story on a number of occasions...

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Tajikistan
Tajikistan is another ex-Soviet country with pipes that can't take the paper, so bin it or take it home with you.

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Tanzania
Holes in the ground are very common in Tanzania, public toilets are not. Against all the odds though, you should be able to flush in a Western-style sitter.

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Thailand
No Thai toilet, squat, Western-flush or otherwise can take toilet paper, so put it in the bin provided. Again, washing is the preferred local method, so make sure you've got some paper with you unless you're going to a posh restaurant or hotel.

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Togo
Yup, you guessed it, it's bins all the way in Togo. You'll be hard pushed to find a toilet that flushes in the first place, so be prepared. Oh, and carry something to wash your hands with as well, there probably won't be running water provided, let alone soap or one of those fancy Airblade hand-drier things.

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Tonga
You're likely to be binning paper in Tonga.

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Trinidad & Tobago
I've been reliably informed that you can flush the paper down any toilet in Trinidad and Tobago, although according to the guidebook I've got here this might not be true; assume you can flush unless specifically told otherwise. If you're going into the jungle, for goodness sake take any paper home with you as it's against the law – not to mention an unpleasant thing to do.

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Tunisia
North African countries are washers, so get the hang of that or bin the paper. Expensive hotels in Tunisia will tend to have western-style toilets that flush though.

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Turkey
In upmarket and European-style hotels in Turkey you'll be able to flush the paper. In other places, there'll be a bin by the side of the toilet so throw the paper in there. If there's a water jug by the side of the toilet, the locals use that to wash; paper may not be readily available, so make sure you've got some with you.

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Turkmenistan
You'll not find many public toilets in Turkmenistan, and if you do you'll be paying a little bit of money to use them; although it has to be said, most will be nasty if you do find one. Flushers or holes in the ground? neither will be able to take the paper, so put it in the bin.

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Tuvalu
Toilets in Tuvalu can be an ecological nightmare, poorly maintained septic tanks are polluting the groundwater which, as the sea level is very high, is close to ground level. Composting toilets are being introduced to help. Bin your paper.

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Uganda
You'll need to bin the paper in Uganda. If you can find a bin. Although moves are afoot to improve the situation, thse aren't always supplied so be prepared to take it all with you; don't fllush, the system really can't take it.

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Ukraine
Most of the time you'll be binning your paper; Ukraine is behind the old iron curtain, and these countries tend to have poorly maintained sewage systems. Paper is in high demand, so make sure you've got some with you

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United Arab Emirates
Arab countries are bottom-washers as a rule; you'll probably be ok to flush the paper in the UAE and the various Emirate states unless you're well off the beaten track.

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United Kingdom
It's fair to say that in the vast majority of toilets in the UK you can just lob the paper in the toilet. There are a few hippies with "composting" toilets, goodness knows what you're supposed to do with those, but I'm sure your green friends will tell you. Probably use leaves or moss or something.

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United States
You're alright to throw the paper in the toilet in the USA, although I have heard unspecified rumours of bins in some of the grottier places of some big cities...

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Uruguay
You still see squat toilets in Uruguay, but mostly you see "normal" toilets. The system is usually not strong enough to take toilet paper, so if there's a bin, use that.

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Uzbekistan
Ex-Soviet state? Locals like to wash? Bin your paper in Uzbekistan. If you can find any...

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Vanuatu
South Pacific islands like Vanuatu are almost exclusively binners; this is to avoid problems with pollution of the groundwater and drinking water supplies.

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Vatican City
Unless you're the Pope and you've got hoards of lackeys to wipe your bottom with swan necks and rose water, then you can flush your paper down the toilet, just like the rest of Rome.

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Venezuela
Use the bins by the side of the toilet for any paper disposal please. This is pretty much the default state of affairs in Central and South America and you get used to it pretty quickly. There's no shame in asking for your bin to be emptied in most places you're likely to stay in Venezuela.

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Vietnam
Vietnam is another South East Asian toilet paper binning country. No public facilities to speak of, mostly squatter types, wash your bottom if you can. Facilities in Vietnam are being updated, so you will come across systems that can take flushing the paper, if you're in a public loo, then ask.

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Yemen
You do find Western-style toilets in Yemen, but they're in a minority, you'll be squatting more often than not. You'll be binning your paper.

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Zambia
Recycled toilet paper is massively popular, even fashionable, in Zambia. Although according to a Times article I've just locals are known to use "the velvety-soft elephant-ear plant". I had to read that a couple of times I have to admit. Bin your paper.

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Zimbabwe
Without wanting to get all cliched about hyperinflation and using dollar bills as paper, toilet paper in Zimbabwe is expensive and you'd better be prepared to hunt around for it as there's massive shortages. Seems a shame to throw it away really, but do. Don't flush.

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As far as possible this stuff is correct, but it's always best to check with a friend before lobbing dirty loo paper in a bin. If it's obviously wrong, you can email me here. ©2010-2016. Made by @mattkitson.